Anatomy Of A Hurricane Video Shoot by Orlando Crew’s Dan Beckmann

Beckmann live with NBC Correspondent Kerry Sanders, just south of the Outer Banks in North Carolina.

Beckmann live with NBC Correspondent Kerry Sanders, just south of the Outer Banks in North Carolina.

It’s been a light year as far as storms are concerned.  However, since we’re smack-dab in the middle of hurricane season, I thought this might be a good time to give a brief overview on what to expect when covering a hurricane:

For the past 15 years, I’ve covered almost every major storm for NBC News…Today Show, Nightly, MSNBC, you name it!  If it’s got a peacock icon on it, I’ve shot for it.

It almost becomes a template, of sorts, covering these things.  And although the technology may change (HD, Go Pro’s, P2 cards, etc.) the coverage remains a constant year in, year out.

Take any stand up, from any reporter, from any year – and replace it with another one from a previous storm. No one would be able to tell the difference.  Standing on a beach?  Check!  Wind blowing?  Check!  Rain slanting? Yep, got that too!

Here’s a brief overview – in pictures – of what to expect…and how to cover a storm correctly:

 

First, we get to see the path.  Are we in the bulls eye?  Who knows?

First, carefully track the path of the storm. Position yourself in the "proposed" bulls eye. Be prepared to move. Then be prepared to move again. Then again. Stock up on gas cans, beef jerky, and Marriott points.

 

The approaching storm.  It's important to shoot the scary clouds.  The calm before the storm always looks menacing.  Plus, it will be the last time you'll be dry for days.

Next, look for spooky weather. It's important to shoot the scary clouds. The calm before the storm always looks menacing. Enjoy the moment. As it will be the last time you'll be dry and comfortable for days.

 

Next, look for a pier that is in tact.  Chances are it won't be there the next morning.

Look around for a pier that is in tact. Chances are it won't be the next morning.

 

Find that same pier.  Watch it go.  Lock down your shot - be prepared to roll hours of tape, or P2 card, to watch the pilings crumble.

Find that same pier during the storm. Watch for it go away. Lock down your shot and be prepared to roll hours of tape, or P2 card, waiting for the pilings to crumble. Your correspondent will thank you for it later.

 

When the storm passes you'll be out of food, out of water, out clean clothes, and out of patience. But the sun is always out and car roofs are an excellent way to do laundry.

When the storm passes you'll be out of food, out of water, out of clean clothes, out of the hotel you've destroyed, out of cell service, and out of patience. But the "day after" brings plenty of sunshine and heat. Car roofs are an excellent way to do laundry.